What makes a good hairdryer? One that isn’t too heavy, that dries our hair fast and, most of all, isn’t too expensive. We’ve looked at these factors and more – heat can, of course, damage your hair, so we’ve also assessed new technology that promises to keep your hair in good condition, too.

Paul Edmonds, hairdresser to the stars, says this new technology can really help your hair. “[Hairdryers] with ionic technology, like the Dyson, blow out negative ions to help break down water molecules, drying your hair faster and leaving it with more shine,” he says.

It’s also worth looking out for hairdryers that have ceramic elements. These promise to give your hair a damage- and frizz-free finish. Meanwhile, tourmaline-infused components help seal hair cuticles, leaving hair with a shine.

Power matters, too. Some of the best hairdryers around are modelling the power of their motors on cars. Babyliss, for example, has collaborated with Ferrari, while Dyson compares the power of its hairdryer to the speed of a Formula One car. Make sure your new hairdryer is at least 1,800 watts.

Here, we put some of the newest models to the test.

You can trust our independent reviews. We may earn commission from some of the retailers, but we never allow this to influence selections, which are formed from real-world testing and expert advice. This revenue helps us to fund journalism across The Independent.

Remington Keratin Protect Dryer AC8008:

The first thing you notice about this sleek hairdryer is its design: the dark silver colour and its streamlined shape. The keratin and almond oil infused ceramic coated grille left our hair shiny and smooth, and meant we didn’t have to wash it again for days.

It sits well in the hand, too, and has three power settings, going up to 2,200W – so it dried our hair quickly.

We did note that it was heavier than some of the dryers we tested, especially if you’re using it to style your hair, but we found this perfectly acceptable. The setting switches also seem to be fixed the opposite way from most switches, which takes a bit of used to, but this wasn’t a deal-breaker, either – it’s just worth noting.

It comes with three attachments: a diffuser, and two nozzles – a 7mm super slim concentrator and 11mm fast drying concentrator.

We thought it was great value for money.

You can trust our independent reviews. We may earn commission from some of the retailers, but we never allow this to influence selections, which are formed from real-world testing and expert advice. This revenue helps us to fund journalism across The Independent. 

Paul Mitchell Neuro Dry Hair Dryer

This hairdryer feels very futuristic: both in its design and its technology. Tourmaline ions mean that the heat shouldn’t damage your hair, while also helping it to dry.

Turning the device on for the first time felt a little odd – as well as turning the on button, you have to pair it with the motion button. However, the latter activates the sensor, so that when you put the hairdryer down it turns off automatically, which we loved.

We also liked the design of the up and down buttons, which cover both speed and heat, and glows up on the bars next to the motion sensor.

A quick drying, clever model with good results.

Lee Stafford Coco Loco Blow & Go Nuts Dryer

The rose gold design from Lee Stafford is incredibly light, but still as powerful as some of the more expensive models on the market.

It comes with one attachment, a pink see-through nozzle, which helps to direct airflow to the part of the hair you want to concentrate on. It also has a removable rear grill cover to help you clean it.

The speed settings and heat settings are a little clunky, but they do their job. The front grille is infused with coconut oil, although we couldn’t quite see the result.

gopal
ga0602634@gmail.com

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